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Dr Jang Sung Tae

Dr Jang Sung Tae receives AERA Award for advancing women's equity

Dr Jang Sung Tae, Assistant Professor of the Department of Education Policy and Leadership, has won the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Special Interest Group (SIG) Research on Women and Education (RWE) Selma Greenberg Dissertation Award.

His study discovered that Southeast Asian female high school students in the United States have the lowest intention of pursuing post-secondary education even though they have earned the highest grades in high school, had good schooling experiences, and did not have significantly different exposure to high-quality teachers (i.e., years of teaching experience, graduate degree) compared to other race or ethnic groups. He also found that the school organizational characteristics used in his study did not mediate or differentiate the patterns related to Southeast Asian girls.

Dr Jang looked at the issue from perspectives of race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, school organizational factors, policies, and social problems. He devised a framework of critical quantitative intersectionality to examine the impact of all factors.

“The award means much to me,” Dr Jang said. “Not only by recognizing my research achievements, but in the association’s affirmation of equity promotion. Education-for-all is not merely a slogan, our research aims to tackle issues pragmatically.”

AERA is the largest national interdisciplinary research association devoted to the scientific study of education and learning. The AERA SIG RWE provides a structure within the AERA for the promotion of research concerning women and girls in education; and provide a mechanism to facilitate communication among researchers and practitioners who are concerned about women and education at the intersection of diverse identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, age, culture, language, ability). This award was named after Dr. Selma Greenberg in 1997, a founding member of the AERA SIG who was a world-class researcher and died in 1997.

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