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Master of Public Policy and Management

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Leading the way forward

The Master of Public Policy and Management (MPPM) Programme is designed to train students in policy science, management, and policy analytics in readiness for leading roles in policy analysis and professional policy practice. Delivered by a team of distinguished specialists, the Programme provides in-service professionals, policy practitioners and future public leaders with skills in policy analysis and evaluation, organization analysis, management, strategic communications, project analysis, public governance, public sector management and development.

The MPPM programme brings leading-edge learning of management issues including human resources, financial management and leadership while fostering students’ capabilities and skills for future placement in professional settings.

CURRICULUM

1-Year Full-time Study Mode
Year Semester Taught Courses Credit Point (cps)
1 1 Core Courses Cross-semester Core Course

(3 cps)

6
Elective Courses 6
2 Core Courses 3
Elective Courses 6
Total Credit Point 24

 

Students may choose any of the four combinations of four Elective Courses from:

  • Specialization I in Governance and Public Management;
  • Specialization II in Social Policy;
  • Specialization III in Higher Education Policy and Management; or
  • Any four courses from Specialization I, II and III without MPPM Specialization.

 

Click here for the Programme Leaflet

Click here for the Student Handbook

Core Courses

This course will review the literature, tools, and strategies that inform quantitative and qualitative methods of research in public policy. The focus of the course will be on generating and using evidence in public policy.
Lectures will cover the following topics:
1. Understanding policy research
• Four levels of policy research
• Basic component of a study: research question, research hypothesis, independent variable, dependent variable, population, sample, and sampling method
• Characteristics of a good sample: Representativeness, sufficient sample size, and acceptable response rate
2. Population, sample, and sampling error
• Population, sample, parameter, and statistics
• Sampling error and its measurement
• Relationship between sample size and sampling error
• Relationship of sampling error with population size, estimated parameter and confidence level
• Justification of sample size in proposal
3. Sampling method
• Random sampling vs non-random sampling
• Simple random sampling, systematic random sampling, multi-stage cluster random sampling, stratified random sampling
• Convenience sampling, snowball sampling and quota sampling
4. Questionnaire design and method data collection
• Design a good questionnaire
• Face-to-face interview, phone interview, and self-administration questionnaire or mail survey
5. Quantitative data analysis with SPSS
• Introduction to SPSS
• Descriptive statistics: Frequency distribution, mean, mode, median, range, standard deviation, and standard error
• Level of measurement:
• Bivariate data analysis: Chi-square test, t-test, and correlation
• Multivariate data analysis: Regression
6. Qualitative method
• In-depth interview, focus group and observation
• Sampling
• Design (single case or multiple cases)
• Qualitative data analysis: Coding, interpreting, analysing, triangulation, verification, rigour, theory building and use of NVIVO
7. Policy evaluation design
• Introduction to policy evaluation design
• Single group post-test design
• Single group pre- and post-test design
• Internal validity of the design
• Experimental and control group pre- and post-test design
• Randomized clinical trial
8. Data analysis in policy evaluation
• Data analysis for single group post-test design
• Data analysis for single group pre- and post-test design
• Data analysis for randomized clinical trial: Attrition analysis, evaluation of randomized group assignment, main analysis
9. Proposal and report writing
• Introduction: Literature review, strategies for justifying the study, objectives and hypotheses
• Method: Design, sampling and sample size, data collection, questionnaire, and statistical analysis
• Ethnical approval and budget in proposal
• Result and discussion in report
This course will last for the whole academic year. The course will start with 13 lectures in the first semester. The students with similar research interests will also form into groups of three to four by the end of the first semester. Under the same broad topic, each student in the group will identify a different research question in the second semester. A faculty member will be assigned to guide their projects. Students will have an oral presentation on the proposal and their findings of the broad topic as a group in Week 3 and Week 13 of the second semester respectively. At the end, students will submit the individual report. Similarity on the write-up among students should be minimal since each student has a different research question.
The research group project is intended to provide students the opportunity to integrate analytical skills and specialized knowledge gained in the MPPG programme and to apply them to analysing and addressing real-world policy problems. Conducting the project will consist of describing the scope and magnitude of the chosen problem, analysing its causes, proposing solutions, and assessing the implications of the proposed solutions.
The topics students choose are expected to be in an area with which students have some practical or academic familiarity. Students will also have the option of joining field trip organized by the Department of Asian and Policy Studies with the purpose of studying a public problem. The field visits are typically to other parts of the Greater China region and Southeast Asia.

Course Outline

This course serves as a foundation course to equip students with key heoretic and analytical abilities essential for understanding the complex world of public policy and governance. Public policy and governance studies are multidisciplinary in nature. This course will draw from major theories and techniques in political science, public administration, sociology, and economics and synthesize into a coherent set of knowledge that students without undergraduate background in related fields can comprehend. Related to this, a salient feature of this course is the extensive use of cases, particularly from Asia. The first half of this course is a systematic survey on concepts, theories and analytic techniques in public policy and governance. In the second half of the course, the focus will be pinned on Asia, especially the Greater China region where most students live and work. This part of the course will lead students to understand and analyze policy and governance issues in the region with theories and methods that will have learned in the first half of the course. Students will experience a variety of pedagogies in this course, including lecture, seminar, movie-screening and discussion, and field visit.

Course Outline

The course introduces the concepts and principles that underpin strategic communication in organizations by focusing in three main areas – understanding human communication, understanding contemporary communication environments and new media, and critical analysis of the applicability and concept of strategic communication.

Course Outline

This course aims to ensure that students are familiar with the nature of organisations, their structures, processes and working environments, and particularly the specific characteristics of public and private organisations particularly in the Asian context. It enables students to understand some of the key concepts and theories in organisational behavior; and analyze the implications of organisational behavior for public and private sector management. This course lays the foundation for the understanding of human behaviour in organisations, providing students with a comprehensive exposure to organisational behaviour theories, research and workplace issues illustrated with case studies and examples primarily within an Asian context.

Course Outline

Elective Courses
Specialization I: Governance and Public Management

This course investigates the fiscal role of government in the modern context. It engages students in the analysis and critique of the fundamental issues of public finance and budgeting. Drawing on the cases of Mainland China, Hong Kong, other countries such as the USA, the course covers the topics ranging from fundamental principles of public finance, the role of government, budget process and procedures, revenue generation, intergovernmental fiscal relations to education finance and income distribution. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to compare and critically understand public finance and budgeting in various contexts.

Course Outline

This course examines public administration and management in selected Asian countries, utilizing case discussions and critical readings. Students will be exposed to three thematic areas: (1) understanding the nature of change in public administration and management in Asia; (2) analysing opportunities for, and constraints on, the use of reforms that dominate contemporary debates in the public sector; and (3) assessing the outcomes, policy benefits and costs associated with the changing nature of public administration and management among various sectors across Asia.

Course Outline

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of project appraisal and impact analysis. The core areas include project planning, cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, multi-criteria analysis, experiments and quasi-experiments, regression framework, impact assessment approaches such as EIA and SIA, etc. Examples of applications, especially in the Asian context, will be drawn during the lectures. This course will enable students to understand the social, economic and environmental issues related to resource allocation of public programmes and projects. They will learn tools to help assessing and improving public-sector projects in terms of their purposes, design, implementation and efficiency.

Course Outline

This course aims to critically engage students with contemporary issues and developments in human resource management (HRM). Adopting a diverse multi-disciplinary, cross-cultural and comparative approach the course will require students to discover, analyse and contribute to providing creative solutions for specific HRM issues and enable applicants to examine the key concepts, core issues, principles and processes in HRM; discover the principles and theories of HRM particularly in the public sector; apply the concepts and theories to analyze HRM issues and the challenges facing the public sector today. The course expects to discuss the HRM practices in a number of Asian countries to demonstrate an understanding on how the public sector reforms have impacted the principles and processes of HR issues.

Course Outline

This course aims to recognize significant recent trends and developments in theories and practices in international public management. It further examines the processes and the impact of globalization, internationalization, diffusion and transfers on public sector management and public sector reform. It enables applicants to analyse key aspects of public management through comparisons of key management reforms within the Asia-Pacific region and beyond.

Course Outline

This course aims to enable students to understand regulation and regulatory governance used in various parts of the world, with an emphasis on real-world examples from Asia and China.
Part A of the course introduces students to the fundamental and practical aspects of regulation: development, enforcement, monitoring, and revision. It uses real-world examples to illustrate the following multi-step approach:
• Identify the need for regulation (e.g., the electricity sector as a natural monopoly).
• Set the public policy goals (e.g., safe, reliable, clean and affordable service).
• Design regulation to achieve those goals, given the behaviour of the directly regulated entity and other stakeholders (e.g., electricity consumers and producers, manufacturers of energy-efficient appliances, and real estate developers of green buildings).
• Monitor regulatory performance (e.g., has the regulation resulted in safe, reliable service at an affordable cost? and has it reduced electricity generation’s emissions?).
• Revise the regulation to improve its performance (e.g., should there be tighter emissions control on electricity production?).
To ensure students’ firm understanding, Part A requires students to form teams, each performing a case study of a sector/industry in Asia that impacts one’s daily life (e.g., airline, auto manufacturing, banking, construction, drug manufacturing, education, energy, finance, food supply, health care, gaming/gambling, internet commerce, news media, non-government organizations, public housing, shipping, taxi, telecommunication, television broadcasting, and trucking). Each team may have up to three members, although a student may choose to work as a one-person team.
Part B focuses on regulatory governance. Regulation can fail sans good regulatory governance that encompasses the systems, processes, and tools designed and implemented to ensure regulatory quality. To see this point, consider the case of food safety (e.g., baby milk formula). A safe and reliable supply of baby milk formula cannot occur without addressing such issues in regulatory governance as:
• Clarity of the regulatory mandate (e.g., safe and adequate supply);
• Key driver for a regulator agency’s establishment (e.g., public interest vs. industry profit);
• Choice of a regulatory agency’s leader (e.g., an independent health expert vs. a researcher from the industry);
• Accountability and transparency (e.g., limited vs. strong oversight by an independent third party);
• Incentive for compliance (e.g., bad publicity, loss of business licences, fine, and imprisonment);
• Independence and competence (e.g., biased and inapt vs. fair and competent);
• Scope and responsibility (e.g., narrow vs. broad); and
• Funding and authority (e.g., poorly funded and weak vs. adequately funded and strong).
To ensure students’ firm understanding, Part B requires each team to perform a follow-up study of regulatory governance for the case chosen in Part A. This study should focus on the systems, processes, and tools for effecting regulatory quality, rather than Part A’s study on the development, design and revision of a particular regulation.

This course aims to enable students to understand environmental policies and their governance in various parts of the world, with an emphasis on real-world examples from Asia and China.
Part A of the course introduces students to the fundamental and practical aspects of an environmental policy: development, assessment and revision. It uses real-world examples to illustrate the following multi-step approach:
• Identify the need for the policy (e.g., global warming due to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions );
• Set the policy target (e.g., 50% below the 2000 level by year 2030);
• Identify the possible policy actions to achieve the target (e.g., promote energy-efficient appliances and buildings, increase fuel-efficient/electric cars, retire coal-fired power plants, and develop renewable, nuclear energy, and clean vehicular fuels).
• Formulate a policy plan that may include regulations (e.g., no old dirty cars on the road by 2020), tax and subsidy (e.g., exemption of registration fee for electric cars), and quota-based programs (e.g., renewable portfolio standards (RPS) to develop wind generation for electric car charging).
• Assess the plan’s merit from various perspectives (e.g., costs and values, political and public acceptance, science and technology, administration and management).
• Revise the policy and its plan after their implementation to address such questions as: (a) should the policy target be tightened? and (b) should its plan be changed?
To ensure students’ firm understanding, Part A requires students to form teams, each performing a case study of an environment policy in Asia that impacts one’s daily life (e.g., air quality, electricity generation, energy consumption, environmental education, food production, land use, mining and resource extraction, marine resources, public transportation, toxic waste, and water quality). Each team may have up to three members, although a student may choose to work as a one-person team.
An environment policy can fail sans good governance. Hence, Part B focuses on environmental governance that entails interventions to change environment-related incentives, institutions, decision making, and behaviour. It includes regulatory processes, mechanisms and organizations through which political actors influence environmental actions and outcomes. To see this point, consider the case of large GHG reductions that cannot occur without addressing such questions in environmental governance as:
• Who are the major consumers of fossil fuels that contribute to GHG emissions and global warming (e.g., cars, electricity generators, and manufacturing plants)?
• What are the other sources of GHG emissions (e.g., coal and wood as cooking/heating fuel, deforestation, farming, land fill, and fossil fuel extraction)?
• Do these consumers believe that global warming is a real risk, rather than a scientific hoax?
• Do they act on their own, without intervention of any kind, to reduce GHG emissions?
• How do they respond to regulatory processes (e.g., GHG emissions standards), incentive mechanisms (e.g., carbon taxes) and organizations (e.g., government agencies and self-regulatory bodies)?
• What are the characteristics of the global warming problem that transcends national borders (e.g., developed vs. developing countries), space (e.g., Asia vs. North America), and time (current vs. future generation)?
• What are the actions that the government, communities, businesses, and NGOs may take to achieve GHG reductions?
• What is the role of decentralization that delegates the responsibility of GHG reductions to local administrative and organizational arrangements, as well as individual decision-making by market participants (e.g., RPS set by individual states in the U.S.)?
• What are the market-based mechanisms that use incentives (e.g., carbon taxes and cap and trade) to induce GHG reductions?
• What are the inter-relationships among international accords, national policies, local decision-making structures, transnational institutions, and environmental groups?
• What is the impact of globalization that interconnects various regions on GHG reductions?
To ensure students’ firm understanding, Part B requires each team to perform a follow-up study of environmental governance for the case chosen in Part A. This study should focus on the systems, processes, and tools to effectively execute an environmental policy, rather than Part A’s study on the development, design and revision of the policy.

Course Outline

The Internship / Overseas Experiential Learning course prepares our future public manger or administrators to gain and apply their knowledge in realistic situations through an industry placement for eight weeks or an overseas experiential learning via lectures and site visits for one week. The involvement in Internship / Overseas Experiential Leaning will facilitate students to network in professional fields they are considering for career paths and grant them an opportunity for professional advancement. It will enable students advance team working roles and skills and boost group bonding through engagement in a variety of collaborative and competitive extended team-based exercise. It is anticipated that the skills attained from working with an organization or overseas lectures and site visits will benefit students in facilitating them to enhance their performance on their jobs after graduation. Students taking this course can either choose the Internship stream or Overseas Experiential Learning Stream.

Course Outline

Elective Courses
Specialization II: Social Policy

In the past two decades, managing social services has undergone drastic changes with the call for greater accountability in the delivery of social services with limited financial budgets as well as higher expectations for service quality. The objective of the course is to enhance students’ knowledge of the social services sector and equip them with the skills to improve the sector’s performance. Emphasis will be on practical and proven methods of management as well as innovative approaches consistent with best professional practices. The course will also cover a critical analysis of current social problems leading to responses of the community in formulation of social policies and organization of social services.

Course Outline

Social protection has been a mounting challenge for many governments in Asia and the world. Population aging and frequent economic crises, along with rising income inequality and poverty, are posing unprecedented threats to governments as well as families. Globalization has a further impact on social, economic and political developments of societies in Asia, which generate substantial policy implications. The course will discuss the root causes of these problems and, more importantly, examine the different approaches to protecting the population from income insecurities. Adopting a comparative approach, this course will enable students to understand the design and implications of the major social protection programmes in the Asian region.

Course Outline

This elective is designed for the Master of Public Policy and Governance (MPPG) students in the specialization of social policy. The aim of this survey course is to equip students with foundation knowledge on health policy, a key field in the social policy arena. The comparative perspective adopted will enable students to go beyond theories and examine health policies internationally with concrete cases. The course starts from a systematic survey on health care, health market, health care financing, provision, and public health, followed by a systematic review of health policies in selected countries and regions. Emerging contemporary health policy issues will also be covered. Students will engage in comparing and contrasting health policy arrangements and issues in Asia and beyond, with the purpose of understanding their policy background, system design, and major challenges. Students will experience a variety of pedagogies in this course, including lecture, seminar, movie-screening and discussion, instructor-guided group project, and field visit. Students will get the opportunity to visit representative public hospitals in both Hong Kong and Mainland China, in order to deepen their understanding on the health systems closest to them.

Course Outline

Societies are aging rapidly and policymakers are scrambling to prepare for it. This course is intended to enhance understanding of the contexts, processes and contents of public policy towards aging in Asia. The course will investigate the aging phenomenon, analyse its impact on governments and societies, assess past and current policy responses to it, and consider options for improvements in policy responses. It will emphasize critical issues such as income maintenance, health care, housing, and long term care for the aged. The goal of the course will be to encourage students to think critically and creatively about the challenges and opportunities of aging society.

Course Outline

Urban poverty is becoming a widespread phenomenon following decades of economic globalization. The dominance of neo-liberalist economic ideology and the global ‘‘race to the bottom’’ have resulted in an increasing number of people living in polarized urban societies. Reducing poverty and improving socio-economic equality are important societal goals as they are vital to sustainable and inclusive development. In this course, we will introduce to students the conceptual skills and practical tools that allow them to critically examine the issue of poverty and inequality, and to identify solutions to the problems. The course will explore the philosophical underpinning of poverty reduction from the perspective of applied ethics and introduce different definitions of poverty and measurement approaches. The political economy, especially the ideology of neo-liberalism, and various types of welfare regimes will be discussed. The course will also examine various factors that lead to poverty as well as poverty reduction policies adopted by governments.

Course Outline

The Internship / Overseas Experiential Learning course prepares our future public manger or administrators to gain and apply their knowledge in realistic situations through an industry placement for eight weeks or an overseas experiential learning via lectures and site visits for one week. The involvement in Internship / Overseas Experiential Learning will facilitate students to network in professional fields they are considering for career
paths and grant them an opportunity for professional advancement. It will enable students advance team working roles and skills and boost group bonding through engagement in a variety of collaborative and competitive extended team-based exercise. It is anticipated that the skills attained from working with an organization or overseas lectures and site visits will benefit students in facilitating them to enhance their performance on their jobs after graduation. Students taking this course can either choose the Internship stream or Overseas Experiential Learning Stream.

Course Outline

This course teaches social policy concepts and theories. It examines critically major social policy challenges confronting societies in Greater China and Asia. A key feature of this course is social policy issues are addressed through case examples and accompanied by concrete analyses based on policy practices of societies in the region. Adopting a comparative approach in analyzing policy formation and implementation, this course will enable students to understand the most recent developments related to poverty alleviation, health, social security, and housing policies in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore. Students will engage in comparing and contrasting major social policy issues with the purpose of understanding their underlying dynamics and devising appropriate responses.

Course Outline

Elective Courses
Specialization III: Higher Education Policy and Management

The course aims at helping students develop competencies needed for conducting academic research. The course will provide a unique opportunity for students to conduct research, deliver presentation and engage in academic discussions. As researchers, students are required to conduct applied research studies on current higher education issues under the guidance of an academic supervisor. As presenters, students are expected to present and defend their research studies in front of fellow classmates and academic supervisor. As discussants, students are required to actively participate in all the seminars by critically reviewing the research studies of fellow students. This course will facilitate the transition in the intellectual lives of postgraduates from course takers to independent researchers.

Course Outline

Higher education has overwhelmingly reformed in the past two decades, and those involved in the academic enterprise have yet to tackle with the implications of these changes. The expansion of articulate policies and plans is vital to bring about real and sustainable change in education systems throughout the world. This course intends to expose students via the experience of leading speakers in managing global universities, to issues like managing ranking, internationalization, media and communication, system governance, finance and strategic recruitment, intellectual property and higher education, institutional autonomy and academic freedom etc.

Course Outline

Internationalization in the higher education sector and growing interest in evidence-based policy making have resulted in an increasing demand for accountability, transparency and the development of quality assurance frameworks that can provide on-going assessment of teaching and research quality along with administrative and institutional management capacity. These include the emplacement of administrative and management protocols for the management of student well-being, the student learning environment, professional development, and institutional capacities to manage unforeseen events or changes in the external environment that impact resources, governance and the systemic integrity of the sector. As part of the emergence of quality assurance systems, risk management has thus become an integral feature for higher education institutions including the development risk monitoring, mitigation and management strategies and otherwise seen as integral to overall quality enhancement.
This course introduces students to a range of managerial and institutional policy instruments used in the development and operation of Quality Assurance procedures and in the development of institutional and management tools designed to prepare for, and meet the needs of, crisis events, crisis planning and management. The course introduces students to the theories and applications of crisis management philosophies and approaches and quality assurance and governance in the public service sector generally and the higher education sector in particular. The course also focuses on the practical aspects of quality assurance and crisis management in the context of public relations, strategic communications, and the management of risk events, risk perceptions and risk recovery, as well as the practical aspects of quality assurance and quality enhancement at the institutional level.

Course Outline

This course is designed to help participants to get exposed to the actual practitioners playing the leadership role in the tertiary sector. Students will be working alongside academic and administrative leaders from a wide range of academic departments and corporate administrative areas who will have their own experiences in the leadership and management in the tertiary sector. This will facilitate students to become successful leaders and negotiators, deal with challenging people and hard bargainers, and manage engagement productively. The module will cover a variety of issues from recruitment, staff retention, institutional rankings, management of academic programmes, stakeholder engagement, and academic leadership − among other issues.

Course Outline

The Internship / Overseas Experiential Learning course prepares our future public manger or administrators to gain and apply their knowledge in realistic situations through an industry placement for eight weeks or an overseas experiential learning via lectures and site visits for one week. The involvement in Internship / Overseas Experiential Leaning will facilitate students to network in professional fields they are considering for career paths and grant them an opportunity for professional advancement. It will enable students advance team working roles and skills and boost group bonding through engagement in a variety of collaborative and competitive extended team-based exercise. It is anticipated that the skills attained from working with an organization or overseas lectures and site visits will benefit students in facilitating them to enhance their performance on their jobs after graduation. Students taking this course can either choose the Internship stream or Overseas Experiential Learning Stream.

Course Outline

This course focuses on critical examination of major social policy challenges and issues confronting the societies in Greater China. Adopting a comparative approach in analyzing policy formation and implementation, this course will enable students to understand the most recent developments related to major social policies like education, health, social welfare, labour and housing policies in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Macau and other Chinese societies in Southeast Asia. Students will be engaged in comparing and contrasting major social policy issues of selected Chinese societies, and appreciating the complexity of policy formation, implementation and evaluation from comparative perspectives.

Course Outline

This course focuses on several key topics in education and society in Greater China and Asia, bringing together issues of education policy and reform, social inequality, diverse populations, world knowledge system, cross-border higher education and academic mobility, globalization, and economic, political, and social development. The course takes an explicitly comparative approach with each of the issues examined through case studies of different societies within Greater China. Largely student-centered, the course is structured around student-guided discussions of assigned readings, with the goal of encouraging the drawing of conclusions about important educational issues from the comparison of different cases. Through preparation for discussions and their final assignments, students will develop independent inquiry skills to explore the interrelationships between education and social phenomena.

Course Outline

Note: The offering of elective courses and the quota offered is subject to the Department’s decision and students’ enrolment. It may vary in each academic year.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

Applicants applying to the Master of Public Policy and Management should normally hold a recognized Bachelor’s degree. Applicants who obtained degrees from universities in Mainland China are required to provide an Online Verification Report of Higher Education Qualification Certificate (教育部學歷證書電子註冊備案表) issued by the CHSI (學信網) (https://www.chsi.com.cn/xlcx/bgcx.jsp).

For applicants whose qualification is obtained from an institution in a non-English speaking system should normally fulfill one of the following minimum English proficiency requirements:

  • IELTS 6.0; or
  • Grade C or above in GCSE / GCE OL English; or
  • A TOEFL score of 80 (internet-based test); or
  • Band 6 in the Chinese Mainland’s College English Test (CET)
    (a total score of 430 or above and the test result should be valid within two years); or
  • Other equivalent qualifications.

 

Remarks:

Applicants should provide following documents for verification:

  • Applicants who obtained degrees from overseas universities should meet Level 5 (for Bachelor degree or above) of the Hong Kong Qualifications Framework. Reports for Qualifications Assessment can be applied from the Hong Kong Council for Accreditation of Academic and Vocational Qualifications (HKCAAVQ) at https://www.hkcaavq.edu.hk
  • Any other information / documentation as requested by the University.

 

APPLICATION FEE

Local Applicants HK$150

Non-local Applicants HK$300

TUITION FEE

HK$150,000 (for September 2020 Entry)

Any aspect of the course (including, without limitation, the content of the Course and the manner in which the Course is taught) may be subject to change at any time at the sole discretion of the University. Without limiting the right of the University to amend the course, it is envisaged that changes may be required due to factors such as staffing, enrolment levels, logistical arrangements and curriculum changes.

APPLICATION & ENQUIRIES

Interested applicants please submit your application via EdUHK Online Application Systems. Prior to your submission, please visit www.eduhk.hk/acadprog/ for detailed application and admission information.

Should you have enquiries, please do not hesitate to email us at:

For enquiries of MPPM
mppm@eduhk.hk

 

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