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EdUHK Study: Integration of Immigrants from the Mainland in Hong Kong

EdUHK Study: Integration of Immigrants from the Mainland in Hong Kong

2016 August

As a result of the low fertility rate, new immigrants, especially those coming from the Mainland, will continue to be the single most important source for population growth in Hong Kong. However, there is considerable doubt about how these new immigrants are integrated into the Hong Kong society as the territory is turning into a knowledge-based economy, with an employment structure emphasizing education and skills. The social, economic, cultural and political integration of immigrants is a dynamic process and human capital, perceived discrimination, acculturation strategy, and acculturative stress may act as major determinants and moderators in the process of different aspects of integration. For instance, immigrants with better education (i.e. human capitals) are more likely to find better-paid employment (economic integration) and through their working experiences they also manage to establish Hong Kong identity (cultural integration).

To facilitate the integration of new arrivals is one of the major challenges faced by policy makers in Hong Kong. When tackling this issue, it is imperative for policy makers to first identify factors that are contributing to the social, economic, cultural and political integration of new immigrants. In this research project, our objective is to evaluate the social, economic, cultural and political integration and to examine how human capital, perceived discrimination, acculturation strategy and acculturative stress are contributing to the integration of immigrants. We have conducted follow-up interviews with representative sample of immigrants who were participated in a longitudinal study and a cross-section study, respectively.

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Date: 11 August 2016 (Thursday)
Time: 2:30-4:00pm
Venue: B1-1/F-14, EdUHK, Tai Po, N.T.
Speaker: Dr. Isabella Ng Fung-sheung, Assistant Professor, Department of Asian and Policy Studies